thenewenlightenmentage
thenewenlightenmentage:

Are White Holes Real?
Sailors have their krakens and their sea serpents. Physicists have white holes: cosmic creatures that straddle the line between tall tale and reality. Yet to be seen in the wild, white holes may be only mathematical monsters. But new research suggests that, if a speculative theory called loop quantum gravity is right, white holes could be real—and we might have already observed them.
A white whole is, roughly speaking, the opposite of a black hole. “A black hole is a place where you can go in but you can never escape; a white hole is a place where you can leave but you can never go back,” says Caltech physicist Sean Carroll. “Otherwise, [both share] exactly the same mathematics, exactly the same geometry.” That boils down to a few essential features: a singularity, where mass is squeezed into a point of infinite density, and an event horizon, the invisible “point of no return” first described mathematically by the German physicist Karl Schwarzschild in 1916. For a black hole, the event horizon represents a one-way entrance; for a white hole, it’s exit-only.
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thenewenlightenmentage:

Are White Holes Real?

Sailors have their krakens and their sea serpents. Physicists have white holes: cosmic creatures that straddle the line between tall tale and reality. Yet to be seen in the wild, white holes may be only mathematical monsters. But new research suggests that, if a speculative theory called loop quantum gravity is right, white holes could be real—and we might have already observed them.

A white whole is, roughly speaking, the opposite of a black hole. “A black hole is a place where you can go in but you can never escape; a white hole is a place where you can leave but you can never go back,” says Caltech physicist Sean Carroll. “Otherwise, [both share] exactly the same mathematics, exactly the same geometry.” That boils down to a few essential features: a singularity, where mass is squeezed into a point of infinite density, and an event horizon, the invisible “point of no return” first described mathematically by the German physicist Karl Schwarzschild in 1916. For a black hole, the event horizon represents a one-way entrance; for a white hole, it’s exit-only.

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scienceyoucanlove
conservationbiologist:

This photograph of a Cassowary was shot while working on a story for @natgeo “The Other Darwin”. This Cassowary, which was shot at the #ClevelandZoo, was in a closed area, and as far as I could tell, had one goal, which was trying to figure out a way to get the hook on his heal into my body. Some paleontologist say the behavior is similar to the way a #velociraptor might have acted. The article was about British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, the worlds greatest field biologist and co-author of the theory of evolution via natural selection with Charles Darwin. One of his greatest contributions to the field of evolutionary biology is the Wallace Line. Drawn in 1859 this boundary separates the ecozones of Asia & Australia. West of the line are organisms related to Asiatic species; to the east, a mixture of species of Asian and Australian origin is present. The above Bird would have been found on the Asian side of this line. While a different species will fill the same niche on the Australian side. @robertclarkphoto @thephotosociety @instituteartists

conservationbiologist:

This photograph of a Cassowary was shot while working on a story for @natgeo “The Other Darwin”. This Cassowary, which was shot at the #ClevelandZoo, was in a closed area, and as far as I could tell, had one goal, which was trying to figure out a way to get the hook on his heal into my body. Some paleontologist say the behavior is similar to the way a #velociraptor might have acted. The article was about British naturalist Alfred Russel Wallace, the worlds greatest field biologist and co-author of the theory of evolution via natural selection with Charles Darwin. One of his greatest contributions to the field of evolutionary biology is the Wallace Line. Drawn in 1859 this boundary separates the ecozones of Asia & Australia. West of the line are organisms related to Asiatic species; to the east, a mixture of species of Asian and Australian origin is present. The above Bird would have been found on the Asian side of this line. While a different species will fill the same niche on the Australian side. @robertclarkphoto @thephotosociety @instituteartists

scienceyoucanlove

cool-critters:

Irukandji jellyfish

Irukandji jellyfish are small and extremely venomous jellyfish that inhabit marine waters of Australia. But according to a National Geographic documentary on jellyfish the species has been found in waters as far north as the British Isles, Japan, and the Floridacoast of the United States. They are able to fire their stingers into their victim, causing symptoms collectively known as Irukandji syndrome. The Irukandji syndrome is produced by a small amount of venom and induces excruciating muscle cramps in the arms and legs, severe pain in the back and kidneys, a burning sensation of the skin and face, headaches, nausea, restlessness, sweating, vomiting, an increase in heart rate and blood pressure, and psychological phenomena such as the feeling of impending doom. The symptoms last from hours to weeks, and victims usually require hospitalisation. The size of the Irukandji jellyfish is roughly a cubic centimetre (1 cm3). There are 4 known species of Irukandji. photo credits: wikipedia, deadlylist, life-sea

thenewenlightenmentage
thenewenlightenmentage:

Supernova Seen In Two Lights
The destructive results of a mighty supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate blend of infrared and X-ray light, as seen in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton.
The bubbly cloud is an irregular shock wave, generated by a supernova that would have been witnessed on Earth 3,700 years ago. The remnant itself, called Puppis A, is around 7,000 light-years away, and the shock wave is about 10 light-years across.
The pastel hues in this image reveal that the infrared and X-ray structures trace each other closely. Warm dust particles are responsible for most of the infrared light wavelengths, assigned red and green colors in this view. Material heated by the supernova’s shock wave emits X-rays, which are colored blue. Regions where the infrared and X-ray emissions blend together take on brighter, more pastel tones.
The shock wave appears to light up as it slams into surrounding clouds of dust and gas that fill the interstellar space in this region.
From the infrared glow, astronomers have found a total quantity of dust in the region equal to about a quarter of the mass of our sun. Data collected from Spitzer’s infrared spectrograph reveal how the shock wave is breaking apart the fragile dust grains that fill the surrounding space.
Supernova explosions forge the heavy elements that can provide the raw material from which future generations of stars and planets will form. Studying how supernova remnants expand into the galaxy and interact with other material provides critical clues into our own origins.
Infrared data from Spitzer’s multiband imaging photometer (MIPS) at wavelengths of 24 and 70 microns are rendered in green and red. X-ray data from XMM-Newton spanning an energy range of 0.3 to 8 kiloelectron volts are shown in blue.
NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Science operations are conducted at the Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Spacecraft operations are based at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Littleton, Colorado. Data are archived at the Infrared Science Archive housed at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.
For more information about the Spitzer mission, visit http://spitzer.caltech.edu and http://www.nasa.gov/spitzer.

thenewenlightenmentage:

Supernova Seen In Two Lights

The destructive results of a mighty supernova explosion reveal themselves in a delicate blend of infrared and X-ray light, as seen in this image from NASA’s Spitzer Space Telescope and Chandra X-Ray Observatory, and the European Space Agency’s XMM-Newton.

The bubbly cloud is an irregular shock wave, generated by a supernova that would have been witnessed on Earth 3,700 years ago. The remnant itself, called Puppis A, is around 7,000 light-years away, and the shock wave is about 10 light-years across.

The pastel hues in this image reveal that the infrared and X-ray structures trace each other closely. Warm dust particles are responsible for most of the infrared light wavelengths, assigned red and green colors in this view. Material heated by the supernova’s shock wave emits X-rays, which are colored blue. Regions where the infrared and X-ray emissions blend together take on brighter, more pastel tones.

The shock wave appears to light up as it slams into surrounding clouds of dust and gas that fill the interstellar space in this region.

From the infrared glow, astronomers have found a total quantity of dust in the region equal to about a quarter of the mass of our sun. Data collected from Spitzer’s infrared spectrograph reveal how the shock wave is breaking apart the fragile dust grains that fill the surrounding space.

Supernova explosions forge the heavy elements that can provide the raw material from which future generations of stars and planets will form. Studying how supernova remnants expand into the galaxy and interact with other material provides critical clues into our own origins.

Infrared data from Spitzer’s multiband imaging photometer (MIPS) at wavelengths of 24 and 70 microns are rendered in green and red. X-ray data from XMM-Newton spanning an energy range of 0.3 to 8 kiloelectron volts are shown in blue.

NASA’s Jet Propulsion Laboratory, Pasadena, Calif., manages the Spitzer Space Telescope mission for NASA’s Science Mission Directorate, Washington. Science operations are conducted at the Spitzer Science Center at the California Institute of Technology in Pasadena. Spacecraft operations are based at Lockheed Martin Space Systems Company, Littleton, Colorado. Data are archived at the Infrared Science Archive housed at the Infrared Processing and Analysis Center at Caltech. Caltech manages JPL for NASA.

For more information about the Spitzer mission, visit http://spitzer.caltech.edu and http://www.nasa.gov/spitzer.