neurosciencestuff
neurosciencestuff:

Venturing inside the teenage brain
If you’ve ever tried to warn teenagers of the consequences of risky behavior — only to have them sigh and roll their eyes — don’t blame them.
Blame their brain anatomy.
Sociologists and psychologists have long known that teen brains are predisposed to downplay risk, act impulsively and be undaunted by the threat of punishment. But now scientists are beginning to understand why.
"I think teenage behavior is probably the most misunderstood of any age group — not only by parents but by teenagers themselves," says Pradeep Bhide, a Florida State University College of Medicine neuroscientist and director of the Center for Brain Repair.
"It’s a critical time in life, and a very stressful one, when they are going through so many changes at the same time that their brains are changing. The teen years are actually a very busy time for brain development."
During the past year, Bhide brought together some of the world’s foremost brain researchers in a quest to explain why teenagers — and male teens in particular — often behave erratically. He and two Cornell University colleagues examined 20 of the leading research projects from brain experts around the world and recently published their findings in a special volume of the scientific journal Developmental Neuroscience.
Read more

neurosciencestuff:

Venturing inside the teenage brain

If you’ve ever tried to warn teenagers of the consequences of risky behavior — only to have them sigh and roll their eyes — don’t blame them.

Blame their brain anatomy.

Sociologists and psychologists have long known that teen brains are predisposed to downplay risk, act impulsively and be undaunted by the threat of punishment. But now scientists are beginning to understand why.

"I think teenage behavior is probably the most misunderstood of any age group — not only by parents but by teenagers themselves," says Pradeep Bhide, a Florida State University College of Medicine neuroscientist and director of the Center for Brain Repair.

"It’s a critical time in life, and a very stressful one, when they are going through so many changes at the same time that their brains are changing. The teen years are actually a very busy time for brain development."

During the past year, Bhide brought together some of the world’s foremost brain researchers in a quest to explain why teenagers — and male teens in particular — often behave erratically. He and two Cornell University colleagues examined 20 of the leading research projects from brain experts around the world and recently published their findings in a special volume of the scientific journal Developmental Neuroscience.

Read more

science-junkie
science-junkie:

'Invisibility cloak' uses lenses to bend light
A device called the Rochester Cloak uses an array of lenses to bend light, effectively rendering what is on the other side invisible to the eye. One of the problems with the cloaking devices developed to date — and it’s a big one — is that they really only work if both the viewer and whatever is being cloaked remain still. This, of course, is not entirely practical, but a difficult problem to solve. For the first time, researchers have made a cloaking device that works multidirectionally in three dimensions — using no specialised equipment, but four standard lenses.
Read more @CNET

science-junkie:

'Invisibility cloak' uses lenses to bend light

A device called the Rochester Cloak uses an array of lenses to bend light, effectively rendering what is on the other side invisible to the eye.
One of the problems with the cloaking devices developed to date — and it’s a big one — is that they really only work if both the viewer and whatever is being cloaked remain still. This, of course, is not entirely practical, but a difficult problem to solve. For the first time, researchers have made a cloaking device that works multidirectionally in three dimensions — using no specialised equipment, but four standard lenses.

Read more @CNET

scienceyoucanlove

nubbsgalore:

photos by matt smith from the Illawarra coast in new south wales of bluebottles, violet snails and blue dragons. 

despite its resemblance to the jellyfish, the bluebottle is more closely related to coral. known as a zooid, the bluebottle (or portugese man of war) is a colonial animal composed of many highly specialized and physiologically integrated individual organisms incapable of independent survival. 

the blue dragon — a type of nudibranch, here no larger than a thumbnail, with its own potent sting — is able to eat the nematocysts (stinging cells) of the bluebottle without discharging them and internally relocate them to the tips of each one of the fingers you can see in the pictures.

for their part, the violet snails also feed on the bluebottles.

notes matt, “despite their potentially dangerous sting, the bluebottle is an amazingly beautiful creature. with strong winds, hundreds of these cnidaria are blown into the bays around my home town and trapped overnight.”

this allows him to capture the above shots, which he creates with use of a fluorescent tube in his strobe light and a homemade waterproof lens dome.

scienceyoucanlove
scienceyoucanlove:

Adermatoglyphia is an extremely rare medical condition which causes a person to have no fingerprints. There are only four known extended families worldwide which are affected by this condition.Recently, the description of a case of a person from Switzerland lacking fingerprints as an isolated finding was published. The phenotype was mapped to chromosome 4q22. In the splice-site of a 3’ exon of the gene for SMARCAD1-helicase, a point mutation was detected. It results in a shortened form of the skin-specific protein. The heterozygous mode of mutation suggests an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance.Other conditions can cause a lack of fingerprints, but unlike them, adermatoglyphia has no other side effects. Mutations in helicases are involved in other rare genetic diseases, for instance Werner syndrome.Photo source and more information:http://1.usa.gov/1qOLZ1S
source 

scienceyoucanlove:

Adermatoglyphia is an extremely rare medical condition which causes a person to have no fingerprints. There are only four known extended families worldwide which are affected by this condition.

Recently, the description of a case of a person from Switzerland lacking fingerprints as an isolated finding was published. The phenotype was mapped to chromosome 4q22. In the splice-site of a 3’ exon of the gene for SMARCAD1-helicase, a point mutation was detected. It results in a shortened form of the skin-specific protein. The heterozygous mode of mutation suggests an autosomal dominant mode of inheritance.

Other conditions can cause a lack of fingerprints, but unlike them, adermatoglyphia has no other side effects. Mutations in helicases are involved in other rare genetic diseases, for instance Werner syndrome.

Photo source and more information:http://1.usa.gov/1qOLZ1S

source 

asapscience
sixpenceee:

The Tesseract is a fourth dimensional cube. As you may know, the 1st dimension is a line, the 2nd dimension adds width to the line (square) , and the 3rd dimension adds depth (cube). The 4th dimension is impossible for us to imagine because we live in a 3D world, but mathematically it exists.  In his theory of special relativity, Einstein called the fourth dimension time, but noted that time is inseparable from space.
Imagine how confusing a drawing of a cube would look like to someone who lives in a 2D world and has never experienced a 3D world. To them it would be overlapping squares. That’s exactly how we perceive the 4th dimension. We don’t understand how it looks but we can represent it on a 3D world. 
If anyone is interested here are some cool articles on this topic. (Can our brains perceive the 4th dimension?) (The 4th Dimension) 

sixpenceee:

The Tesseract is a fourth dimensional cube. As you may know, the 1st dimension is a line, the 2nd dimension adds width to the line (square) , and the 3rd dimension adds depth (cube). The 4th dimension is impossible for us to imagine because we live in a 3D world, but mathematically it exists.  In his theory of special relativity, Einstein called the fourth dimension time, but noted that time is inseparable from space.

Imagine how confusing a drawing of a cube would look like to someone who lives in a 2D world and has never experienced a 3D world. To them it would be overlapping squares. That’s exactly how we perceive the 4th dimension. We don’t understand how it looks but we can represent it on a 3D world. 

If anyone is interested here are some cool articles on this topic. (Can our brains perceive the 4th dimension?) (The 4th Dimension)